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zeldathemes
acciobrandon:

Big Thunder Mountain Railroad 

acciobrandon:

Big Thunder Mountain Railroad 

The next time you check in to a deserted hotel on the dark side of Hollywood, make sure you know just what kind of vacancy you’re filling, or you may find yourself a permanent resident of…The Twilight Zone

beeftony:

justplainsomething:

adrianestpierre:

Gaston really is the most terrifying Disney villain because he could be anyone in the world.

Later he convinces the whole town to set up his wedding with the knowledge that the would-be bride would be thrown into it. Everyone finds his creepy-ass tactics as cute and “boys will be boys” esque. So yeah, he is terrifying.

Yeah, the truly scary thing about Beauty and the Beast isn’t that Gaston exists, but that society fucking loves him. People who deride the movie by saying it’s about Stockholm Syndrome are ignoring that it’s actually about the various ways that truly decent people get othered by society. People don’t trust the Beast because of the way he looks, which only feeds his anger issues and pushes him further away. Gaston isn’t the only one who criticizes Belle for being bookish, either; the whole town says there must be something wrong with her. And her father gets carted off to a mental asylum for being just a little eccentric.

Howard Ashman, who collaborated on the film’s score and had a huge influence on the movie’s story and themes, was a gay man who died of AIDS shortly after work on the film was completed. If you watch the film with that in mind, the message of it becomes clear. Gaston demonstrates that bullies are rewarded and beloved by society as long as they possess a certain set of characteristics, while nice people who don’t are ostracized. The love story between Belle and the Beast is about them finding solace in each other after society rejects them both.

Notice how the Beast reacts when the whole town comes for him. He’s not angry, he’s sad. He’s tired. And he almost gives up because he has nothing to live for. But then he sees that Belle has come back for him, and suddenly he does. In the original fairy tale, the Beast asks Belle to marry him every night, and the spell is broken when she accepts. In the Disney movie, he waits for her to love him, because he cannot love himself. That’s how badly being ostracized from society and told that you’re a monster all your life can fuck with your head and make you stop seeing yourself as human.

Society rewards the bullies because we’ve been brought up to believe that their victims don’t belong. That if someone doesn’t fit in, then they have to be put in their place, or destroyed. And this movie demonstrates that this line of thinking is wrong. It’s so much deeper than a standard “be yourself” message, and that’s why it’s one of my favorite Disney movies.

theresaneverlandwaiting4u:

There were two kinds of employee badges used in the first seven years Disneyland was open. Regular employees had a badge with their employee number. Supervisors and managers had their full names on their badges.

The supervisor badge in the photo above was worn by James Warrick, who came to the park in 1955. The Coast Guard required an on-site captain to be in charge of all the water craft at Disneyland. Mr. Warrick filled this role until 1959, when the requirement was dropped. At that time, he transferred to Disneyland’s Department 41, Maintenance Management, and became the supervisor.

In these early years, the name badges worn at Disneyland were not plastic but metal. They were manufactured by the Los Angeles Stamp and Stationery Company (LASCO), which made many products using stamping presses and dies, such as coins and tokens for local businesses. They also made badges for law enforcement agencies, including the Los Angeles Police Department and the California Highway Patrol.

It’s been reported that the metal badges were used at Disneyland from 1955 through 1962, when the switch to plastic nametags was made. Actually, 1962 was not the absolute end of the metal badges at Disneyland. That same year, LASCO went out of business and sold off its dies and presses. Since no more of the metal badges could be made, Disneyland just decided not to issue any more of them.

Disney decided it would be more cost effective to switch to plastic nametags that could be engraved onsite whenever a new employee was hired. So Disneyland, Inc. contracted with Western Plastics in Long Beach, CA, to make the plastic nametags for Disney Cast Members, which that company did for nearly the next 30 years.

It’s hard to say exactly when the final switch was made to the plastic nametags for all Cast Members at Disneyland. In the 1966 film of the grand opening of It’s A Small World at Disneyland, Cast Members standing behind Walt can clearly be seen wearing the first plastic Disneyland nametags.
Finally, by the arrival of the New Tomorrowland in 1967, all the Cast Members in the park had switched to the plastic nametags.